Founded in 1993, Heritage Shared was a chartered, non-profit organization dedicated to inclusive, participatory community history through historical research and interpretation, publications, history education, exhibits and public programs, and historic preservation.

Early SLO Snippet Compendium

The following items form a compendium of “snippets”(1-3) – each of them being an edited excerpt(4) from a contemporary, primarily first-person, account relating to the history of the immediate area of Town of San Luis Obispo, CA. The objective has been to...

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Aunt Susan Meets the Rampant Suffragist of Crown Hill; Or, How Outside Agitators and Uppity Locals Conspired to Win SLO Women the Vote in 1896

I recalled from general reading that Susan B. Anthony had spearheaded an unsuccessful California woman suffrage campaign in 1896, so I checked the SLO county election returns. There I discovered that while suffrage had lost state-wide by a narrow margin, it had passed in backwater SLO by 54%. The obvious question was how come? I didn’t know the answer, and apart from election tallies and local newspaper accounts the local sources seemed pretty thin.

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Woolen Mills Chinatown of San Jose

The Guadalupe Parkway in San Jose, constructed in the 1960s, near the former Woolen Mills Chinatown was proposed for upgrading in the 1990s. This afforded an opportunity for Caltrans archaeologists and historians to tell the story of the Woolen Mills Chinatown. In this essay, Caltrans Historical Archaeologist Anmarie Medin elucidates the history of a people for whom few English language records are available.

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San Simeon Creek Pioneers in Their Own Voices

There were two sisters and a brother, born in Ohio at the height of the Classical Revival of the 1820’s and given some Greek and Latin names in the spirit of the time. As some of the very earliest pioneers at San Simeon Creek, they were truly free—free to make use of every ounce of talent, education, and courage they possessed.

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A Brief History of the Morro Bay Power Plant

California’s population increase, both during and after World War II, combined with a growing economy and changes in technology, necessitated additional electrical power generation. Morro Bay was chosen as the location for a new power plant, given its proximity to ocean going fuel oil tankers and an unlimited source of cooling water for the power plant’s turbine generators.

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